August 19th, 2017Herbs for the Skin

Jo Francks, M.H.

Our skin is the largest organ of the body. It is often referred to as the third kidney. It is a channel of elimination and also a channel of absorption. The skin absorbs what is applied to it which is why it is so important to be aware of what types of products you are using on your skin and the ingredients that are in those products. Chemicals are absorbed by the skin and are moved through the bloodstream to all the organs of the body.  Our skin is the first line of defense and provides protection to our internal organs. The health of our skin is an indicator or the health of the rest of the body.

All through history there have been many natural botanicals used to promote the health of the skin. Here is a small list of some of the herbs I like to use in skin care products.

Aloe – This is my number one plant for burns. I like to apply the fresh cut leaf to a burn because it is soothing and healing. It has cell proliferant properties and is antiseptic.

Calendula – This is my number one herb for all skin conditions. It relieves pain and itching, prevents infection, and promotes healing. It is used for insect bites and stings, cuts, bruises, and burns.

Comfrey – Historically this herb is the healer of healers. It has nick names of knit bone, and people putty. It’s used for broken bones, wounds, burns, and skin problems of all types. This herb helps put people back together. It is full of nutrition and is one of the few plant sources of vitamin B12.

Plantain – This is my go to herb for bee stings. Pick a fresh leaf or two, chew it up a little and apply it directly over a bee sting. Secure it with a bandage. The plantain takes the pain away very quickly and draws the venom out of the sting. It will also draw toxins and poisons out of any wound and prevent blood poisoning and promote healing.

Chamomile – This is a soothing herb and is antibacterial. It is very good for blemished skin and helps promote a clear complexion. It is used both internally and externally as a tea and a wash for the skin.

Slippery elm – This is the herb I will use as a poultice and will often combine it with other herbs that have the properties needed for a particular issue. I have often combined slippery elm with dried plantain when the fresh wasn’t available for a drawing poultice. Slippery elm is a powerful contact healer. It will heal anything it comes in contact with.

Skin brushing – Dr. Christopher recommended skin brushing to move lymph, to improve circulation, and to remove dead skin cells from the surface of the skin. Use a dry brush with natural bristles on dry skin before you bathe or shower. Start with the soles of the feet moving up the legs then to the hands, arms and body. Brush towards the heart with gentle pressure.

Nutrition – Healthy skin begins within. Eating a healthy diet of lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and making sure you are eliminating properly will do a lot to improve the health of the skin.

Hydration – When a piece of fruit is left out over time what happens? The moisture evaporates and the skin begins to wrinkle. The same thing can happen to our skin if we don’t keep it hydrated by drinking plenty of pure water.

The health of our skin reveals the health of our body. These are some of my favorite herbs to promote healthy skin. I hope you have some favorites that you use and are learning about the many plants and roots that can promote healing.

Jo Francks is a Master Herbalist graduate of The School of Natural Healing. She is also a Holistic Iridologist and Quantum Touch Practitioner.

August 19th, 2017F.A.Q.’s

Tonya Judd, M.H.

For this newsletter I thought it would be fun to address some of our frequently asked questions we get here at the School of Natural Healing.  Let’s get started:

Q:  What do students do with their education once they have completed the School of Natural Healing Master HerbalistProgram? OR What can I do with my education once I have completed the Master Herbalist Program?

A:  Often students enroll in the School of Natural Healing to care for themselves and family members, while others are interested in pursuing careers in the herbal market place. Many of our graduates are participating in some of the following careers:

·         Writing for health magazines

·         Educating at health food stores

·         Instructing at local colleges

·         Consulting for manufacturers

·         Opening and operating health food stores

·         Lecturing at conventions

·         Authoring herb and health texts

Q:  As a Master Herbalist do you focus mainly on using essential oils?

A:  No, although essential oils have their healing properties when used externally and aromatically, Herbalists and Master Herbalists focus on using herbs and whole foods to support the body. We educate those around us about the benefits of using herbs and foods in their wholesome state to cleanse, nourish and heal the body.

Q:  I was receiving Dr. Christopher’s Herbal Legacy Newsletter and now they aren’t coming to my inbox. What happened and what can I do to remedy this?

A:  Sometimes there are technology glitches that can occur which kick an email out of the system.  I have had this happen myself. To remedy this you have a few options:

1.      Unsubscribe using an old Herbal Legacy Newsletter.  The “unsubscribe” button is at the bottom of the newsletter. Once you have “unsubscribed,” go to the following link to sign up again: http://www.herballegacy.com/

2.      If option 1 does not work, try signing up using a different email address.

3.      If option 2 does not work, please call us here at the School of Natural Healing and we will help you.

Q:  Which herbs are safe to take during pregnancy?

A:  We often have students who call concerned that certain herbs are not safe during pregnancy. Our suggestion is always that an herb is safer than a prescription drug or over the counter drug and that whole foods are always safe.  The groups of herbs we suggest that pregnant women stay away from would be herbs within the Emmenogogue and Purgative categories. Emmenagogue herbs are herbs that are uterine stimulant herbs that stimulate blood flow to the uterus and pelvic area. Purgatives are herbs that have a strong laxative effect.

Some herbs we suggest during pregnancy include: Red Raspberry Leaf, Comfrey, Alfalfa, Vitalerbs and the Dr. Christopher’s Pregnancy Tea and Dr. Christopher’s Birth Prep Formula (to be used during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy).

Q:  What can I do to alleviate Menstrual Headaches?

A:  Menstrual headaches are often caused by congestion in the bowel and/or female organs and can also be caused by a prolapsed uterus. Cleansing the bowel and providing herbs to strengthen the uterus and female organs will help. Cleaning up the diet is essential. Eliminate all processed foods, refined foods and carbonated beverages. Eat a diet filled with vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts and seeds. Cayenne does wonders for headaches as it gets the circulation going.

Q:  How long are herbs good for?

A:  The shelf life of herbs that are powdered, cut and sifted, or capsuled is generally 5 years. I often go with the rule that if you can still smell the aroma of the herb, it is often still good.  Herbs do start to lose their potency over time/the longer they are past their expiration date, yet that does not make them unsafe to consume.

Q:  How do I decide between the Online Course and the Correspondence Course and what is the difference between the two?

A:  Both the online course and the Correspondence Course are identical as far as what is taught and the course material that is covered. The difference between the 2 courses is that the Online Course is completed online and the majority of the books you will study from are in an online format. You will complete and submit your study guides online. There will be a few physical books that you will study from that are not online as we do not publish those or have the rights to include an online copy of them. There will be several assignments that you will complete that will need to be submitted via the mail.

If you have a computer, internet access and are able to complete basic tasks on the computer and enjoy working on the computer, then the Online Course would be a great fit for you. If your computer skills are lacking, or if you do not like to spend large chunks of time on the computer it would be best for you to study within the parameters of the Correspondence Course.

The Correspondence Course includes all of the books, study guides, and all of the materials needed to complete your coursework. As a Correspondence Course student, you will study from physical books and complete your study guides, and other assignments and submit them via the mail.

Tonya Judd is a Master Herbalist graduate of the School of Natural Healing.

August 19th, 2017Priddy Meeks: Pioneer Doctor

David Christopher, M.H.

In our area we celebrate Pioneer Day on the 24th of July. This holiday was set aside to honor those courageous souls who risked their very lives to establish our present day communities. It is like celebrating the fourth of July twice in the same month. This said I want to focus on Dr. Priddy Meeks who arrived with the second wagon train arriving in the Salt Lake valley on October 1st 1847.

Before coming west Priddy Meeks was a successful farmer whose daughter Huldah came down with the whooping cough.  Against his better judgment he was encouraged to employ the services of a regular doctor. Priddy Meeks described his methods as, “I am convinced that his medicine killed her.”

I know that if we could go back and investigate his daughter’s death and the deaths of so many Americans of that era we could verify Priddy Meeks declaration that it was the doctor’s medicine that killed his daughter.  The most popular medicine of that era was calomel which was dispensed with careless abandon like candy to crying children.

Later autopsies would reveal the destruction of bowels, lungs, the liver and other organs caused by this crude mercury based drug. Even after discovering the ill effects of the mercury in calomel the pharmaceutical industry continues putting mercury in many products from vaccines to saline solutions.

After Meeks’ daughter died at the hands of the regular doctor, he took it upon himself to help neighbors and friends using common sense and the few herbs and roots he was familiar with. He was able to relieve many of their illnesses. Seeing his success, the community insisted that he should quit work and go to doctoring.  Meeks responded, “I know nothing about doctoring.”  The community replied, “You beat the doctors.”

Meeks purchased the Thompsonian medical course over the objections of his critically ill and dying wife who thought his money would be better spent caring for their children after her death. His studies led him to search for medicines in the wild which he harvested and applied to his dying wife, saving her from her maladies and the prognosis of death.

Dr. Priddy Meeks moved west and ,after establishing a medical practice in the Salt Lake Valley, was asked to support the pioneers who were living south in Parowan. There he was a blessing to the populous. My favorite case of Dr. Meeks was with a teamster, James McCann, who was walking back to the eastern United States from California. He made it as far as Parowan Utah, but both feet were frozen up to the ankles.  He was taken to Dr. Meeks for amputation to save his life. Meeks was inspired to have him take cayenne pepper orally which was administered frequently. The patient immediately felt pain in his numb feet, which was a good sign. To the doctor’s surprise the dead flesh started, “dropping off while steadily being replaced with new flesh.”  Needless to say he saved his feet from being amputated.

Recently one of our teachers at the School of Natural Healing worked with a local chiropractor who got frostbite after getting stranded in a snow storm while hiking in the Alps. Even in the present day the medical remedy was amputation. She went against medical doctor’s orders and massaged the feet with cayenne ointment. She did not “damage” his feet, as the doctors warned but saved him from amputation.

The herbs work today as they did then and will still be valuable hundreds of years from now. We should all learn of the herbs and their healing qualities so we to can relieve suffering and save lives.

David Christopher is a Master Herbalist and the director of The School of Natural Healing. He also co-hosts the popular radio show “A Healthier You” and is a popular international teacher and lecturer.

Kelly Pomeroy, M.H.

I have always loved the summer. There is so much to do outside; swimming, hiking, exploring, sports games and more. There are fresh fruits and vegetables to pick that taste so good. Everything is alive, green and vibrant. In all that enjoyment we can experience some bumps and bruises along the way. I’d like to share some aides that helped me recover from bumps, blisters, and exhaustion. However, never ignore the need to seek professional help in emergencies.

Bumps
It was a wonderful night at the local minor league baseball game, a favorite summertime activity for my children and me. Somewhere in the fifth inning, a foul ball came out into far left field and ricocheted into my eye. It happened so fast I couldn’t react and boy it hurt! The ball hit the rim of my right eye socket which is called the zygomatic bone. It was extremely tender. Unfortunately, I left my purse in the car with my cayenne tincture and other herbal aides. A wonderful EMT looked after me and had me ice the side of my face for the last 4 innings which really made a difference. When I came home I took a blend of herbs consisting of 2 parts turmeric, 1 part ginger, 1 part cayenne and 1 part spirulina. Turmeric is an excellent anti-inflammatory. In addition, I took Dr. Christopher’s Complete Tissue and Bone capsules. This blend of herbs hastens and assists the body in repairing itself. If you don’t have this formula, I would consider taking comfrey, oak bark, slippery elm, or nettles, even a blend of these if you can. These herbs help repair and strengthen bone and tissue. I then took a fresh aloe leaf, opened it and applied the gel to the area where the ball had hit.  After it dried, I applied Complete Tissue and Bone ointment. I followed this protocol for a week, taking the capsules internally about 5-6 times a day. I applied the aloe and ointment in the morning and night. At night I would place a piece of cotton over the area after I had applied the ointment, to prevent it from coming off as I slept. This routine worked so well. I was impressed, as was my family, at how quickly the black eye and inflammation left. This protocol could be used for bruises or breaks in supporting the body’s healing process. Our team lost the game, but what a memorable one!

Blisters
After a few grueling hours in my garden, I realized I had worn a large, painful blister in my palm. It was about the size of a quarter and oh so tender. First I cleaned my hands gently. I then used some gel from the aloe vera plant. I spread the gel on the blistered area and let it dry. Then I placed Complete Tissue and Bone ointment on it. You can also use comfrey, plantain, calendula, or marshmallow preparations to help heal the wounds. Use the gel in the aloe leaf by cutting the spiked sides of the aloe off, cut the leaf in half, exposing the gel. You can run the gel directly on the wound or slice the clear gel segment off and apply it directly to the wound. I then blanched a smooth leaf (I used basil) for 15-20 seconds to kill any bacteria. I used the leaf as a bandage to go directly over the ointment and then a Band-Aid or cloth over that. I had used a cotton cloth directly over the ointment initially but discovered that the fibers irritated the skin tremendously. Using the leaf soothed and hastened my healing. Never clear off the ointment when healing a wound. You could inadvertently wipe off new cell growth. Just add more aloe or ointment to the area and add a new bandage leaf daily. This works well with both burns and blisters in aiding the healing process. “Aloe vera penetrates the skin quickly and deeply. This allows water and other moisturizers to sink deeply into the skin, restoring lost fluids and replacing the fatty layer….It heals blemishes with little to no scarring.” (Herb Syllabus, Christopher) “Aloe vera contains glucomannan, a mannose rich polysaccharide, and gibberellin, a growth hormone, which stimulates activity and proliferation.” (Indian Journal of Dermatology, Surjushe, Vasani, and Saple)  My hand healed without scarring. I love plants!

Exhaustion
Recently I was visiting a very hot climate. I am a runner and had been running a lot the past few mornings. I had been drinking enough water or so I thought. By the third day, I felt exhausted and had an uncommonly intense headache. When we sweat we lose minerals that are required by our body to function. All I wanted was watermelon and lots of it. Watermelon has potassium and small amounts of sodium in it that supports our sodium potassium pump which is vital to our lives and is full of water. I also drank a cup of hot water with a pinch of cayenne, knowing this would equalize my blood pressure and help my headache leave. By replenishing my body with water, sodium, potassium, and other minerals and then equalizing my blood pressure the headache left and I quickly recovered.
When spending time outside this summer, remember to drink lots of water before, during and after you go outside to best support your body. Celery, dates and coconut water are also great natural sodium and potassium sources (aka electrolytes) to help replenish and stabilize body fluids.
Bumps, blisters, and exhaustion may come, so be prepared. Have a safe, happy and healthy summer!

Kelly Pomeroy is a Master Herbalist, mother of four, and works for the School of Natural Healing. She is also pursuing her Biology degree at a local University

David Christopher, M.H.

The three foods that we eat are carbohydrates, proteins and fats.  Although they are found throughout the food chain they are best utilized from the plants from which they are originally manufactured.  All life depends on plant foods.  Plants also provide essential nutrients such as vitamins and minerals. Plant nutrients are essential because we animals do not produce them. There is an exception, vitamin D, which we manufacture by exposure to the sun. When the sun hits our skin cholesterol (also produced by us) it is converted to vitamin D.  The other exception is vitamin B-12 which is manufactured, not by us, but by the friendly bacteria that inhabits our lower intestines. In a symbiotic way we feed this type of bacteria our mucous and it excretes vitamin B -12. Plants uptake the minerals from the soil, add a carbon bond and an enzyme wrap creating a more absorbable and easier path of elimination. Eating plants is much safer and more efficient than eating dirt (manufactured minerals).

Basically speaking, plant carbohydrates vary in complexity allowing immediate use of glucose (the fuel for our bodies) and other configurations like fructose which needs to be converted to glucose by the liver. Other more complex configurations of carbohydrates take more time to break down providing “time released “energy. Sweet carbohydrate foods like berries and fruit give us immediate energy while less sweet vegetables provide energy later. The more complex carbohydrates found in legumes, grains, nuts and seeds take longer to break down and energy is provided even later.

When carbohydrates are expended the body converts the glycerol from fats to glucose, so long term energy is also available. Mono-saturated, poly-unsaturated and even saturated fats are all necessary and can all be found in plants. Besides fats being used for energy, they also are needed for healthy skin and for the utilization of fat soluble vitamins like A, D, E and K.  Fats are needed for many functions such as body insulation, brain development and blood clotting. Some excellent sources of fats from plants include avocados, macadamia nuts, coconut (wonderful source of saturated fats), Brazil nuts (highest source of selenium) all nuts and seeds.

The other food we eat is protein. Although most of the amino acids in proteins can be used for energy (converted to glucose) the pathway is more complex for a purpose and is used for energy as a last resort. The original purpose for amino acids in protein is to be used to make new cells for all parts of the body. All organs, tissues and bones are dependent on these amino acids as is the production of enzymes that digest food and activate your metabolism and are used to make neurotransmitters and hormones. Protein should not be wasted on making energy.

Let me dispel a common comment which is, “Oh I feel more energized when I eat a lot of protein rich foods.”  It is not because protein is providing energy, it is because protein makes you satiated. This is the good feeling signal that your body gives out to reward you for consuming adequate protein needs. All plants provide protein as well as fats and carbohydrates.  Some excellent protein rich foods include all grains, legumes, nuts and seeds.  Dark green leafy vegetables are rich in protein and again, all plants contain various amounts of protein.

Man and animals need plant life to make and maintain cell structure. Meat exists because plants exist. Man eats meat out of want not out of need.

Quantitative data on nutrient needs are utilized to promote man’s wants and greed to promote and profit from products.

Dr. Christopher often answered seemingly complex questions like quantitative nutrient needs, food combining and protein requirements with the simple phrase, “Ask any gorilla?” Gorillas do not pour over research trying to develop ideal dietary needs, rather, they eat what nature provides. Their diet is mostly plant based, and they die naturally in their old age with all their teeth and hair.

If we return to nature and eat plants in their raw, live state we can receive all the necessary nutrients we need.  These three plant based foods will allow us to die when our time comes, perhaps with all of our hair and teeth.

David Christopher is a Master Herbalist and the director of The School of Natural Healing. He also co-hosts the popular radio show “A Healthier You” and is a popular international teacher and lecturer.

David Christopher, M.H.

The hero of the Revolutionary War, former first President and by certain accounts the most famous man in the world was actively managing his estate and affairs robustly and in good health at the age of 67. On December 12, 1799 George Washington routinely left his home at 10 am and by horseback attended to his beloved Mount Vernon farms until 5 PM. The weather was below freezing and snowing with just 3 inches of snow on the ground.  In this weather, he also helped move a snow-mired carriage near his home. Upon returning he felt a sore throat and developed hoarseness. However, without removing his damp clothes he proceeded to dinner, which was waiting, and then went on to his evening routines. The next day, Friday, although less invigorated due to the possible acquired cold, he marked trees on the property which were to be removed. He then had a pleasant evening and even joked about his worsening hoarseness. Two o’clock Saturday morning he was chilled, could scarcely speak and breathed with difficulty.  In the morning a servant was dispatched to retrieve Dr. Craik and another servant was dispatched for a Mr. Rawlins who was a local bleeder. Mr. Rawlins removed a half pint of blood and then Dr. Craik upon arriving removed another pint of blood and dosed the former President with calomel (a mercury preparation). Two more Doctors arrived and yes removed even more blood and administered more mercury, purgative enemas and blistering plasters. A fourth bleeding was proposed and immediately protested by Dr. Elisha Dick the youngest of the three doctors. However, he was overruled by Dr. James Craik and a Dr. Richard Brown who then bled George Washington a fourth time and of course administered another round of mercury and another toxic chemical, antimony. It is estimated that half of his blood had been removed. By today’s standards that much loss of blood would result in extremely low blood pressure and would require an immediate transfusion along with intensive care. Medical apologists today say that the General died from bacterial epiglottitis and that an emergency tracheotomy would have saved his life. Perhaps we shouldn’t judge those physicians by today’s standards but we can listen to their own words. Two weeks later Dr. Brown had misgivings and in a letter to Dr. Craik said, “If we had taken no more blood from him, our good friend might have been alive now.”  He added, “But we were governed by the best light we had. We thought we were right, and so we are justified.”  A contemporary British physician John Reid sarcastically remarked that the “current of blood” drained from George Washington reflected the currents of American rivers. He then was critical of the heavy dosing of mercury and the administrations of emetics and blistering to a man in his late 60’s.

In retrospect we should ask if that was the best light available in the 1700s? We do know as a fact that herbalists were present in the 1700s and for that matter in all eras. They were sometimes praised and sometimes ignored. We know that herbalists would have used remedies that were simple such as; lemon grass, rose hips, garlic and onions that could have saved our beloved leader’s life. The emerging Thompsonian doctors could have relaxed the muscles with Lobelia and applied cayenne to the throat to increase circulation. Perhaps the native population could have provided golden seal with its berberine alkaloid that kills bacteria. It is a fact that there was plenty of light and knowledge available in 1799 that could have been used by the Washington family instead of turning to the popular or mainstream doctors of that day with their blood-letting and poisonous practice. At any rate, the sudden agonizing death of George Washington was untimely and a great loss to his family and countrymen.

David Christopher is a Master Herbalist and the director of The School of Natural Healing. He also co-hosts the popular radio show “A Healthier You” and is a popular international teacher and lecturer.

Jo Francks, M.H.

Juniperus monosperma, or one seed juniper, is a very hardy tree native to the southwestern United States. It can grow to heights of 25 feet and has flat scale-like leaves and bluish-green berries which take two years to ripen. The second year berries are blue, while the first year berries are green.

Dr. Christopher discovered the wonderful medicinal qualities of cedar berries by accident. He had a patient with a kidney problem who couldn’t void his urine. Dr. Christopher told him to use juniper berries to clear up the problem. When the man came back and informed Dr. Christopher that the juniper berries weren’t working they discovered the berries he was using weren’t true juniper berries, they were cedar berries. Cedar berries have one stone and juniper berries have 3 to 7 stones. The man told Dr. Christopher that the berries weren’t doing anything for his kidney condition, but since he had been taking them he noticed he did not have to use as much insulin. Dr. Christopher then began to experiment with cedar berries and discovered that it helped his patients that had diabetes and the ones who had hypoglycemia. Dr. Christopher emphasized that both diabetes and hypoglycemia stem from the same problem – a weak pancreas. From these experiences he came up with his Pancreas formula which helps the pancreas and other affiliated glands that, through malfunction, cause high or low blood sugar. It has always been recommended to use this formula along with the mucusless diet.

I knew a man who had a stroke. Afterwards he was diagnosed with diabetes from some of the tests the doctor had done. He was monitoring it through diet and blood tests to check his blood sugar levels. I gave him a bottle of cedar berry tincture with instructions to take a dropper with each meal. A few months later he went back for a checkup. They gave him results of the tests they had done that day but said nothing about diabetes so he asked, “what about the diabetes?” He was told he didn’t have diabetes. He felt that the diabetes went away thanks to the cedar berry tincture he had been using.

Cedar berries have also been used for digestive issues, skin problems such as acne and psoriasis, and as a blood purifier. They can be used as a tea or tincture internally or externally.


Jo Francks works at the School of Natural Healing as a Student Adviser and Master Herbalist. She is a certified Iridology instructor through the International Iridology Practitioners Association (IIPA) and a Quantum Touch Practitioner.

August 18th, 2017Water is Life

Tonya Judd, M.H.

When living a wholistic lifestyle we use water in so many applications: drinking, soaking grains, nuts and seeds, making poultices, healing baths, tinctures, teas, fomentations, water therapy, growing food, sprouting, eye washes, enema’s and cleansing the skin.

The human body is made up of at least 75% water. Water makes up 85-90% of our brain, 92% of our blood and 70% of our muscles. Water is vital to our organs and their optimal function which makes water vital to our survival. We can survive without food for a disputable number of days depending on the level of health and other individualized scenarios. The human body can only “survive” for 3-10 days without water. Water flushes out toxins and carries oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. We breathe out an estimated 1 1/2 cups of water each day. We also lose water each day through sweating, urinating and bowel movements. Water is used in many functions within the body and is known as, “the universal solvent.” Water is used as a “coolant” by evaporating sweat through the skin and can also disperse heat throughout the body.

If we are not replenishing that lost liquid, we may experience: constipation, dry skin, headache, fatigue, low immunity, brain fog, blood pressure fluctuation, blurred vision, hormonal fluctuation, mood swings, feeling hungry even though you have recently eaten, lethargic, low energy levels, aching joints, dehydration and many others.

There are many opinions and many options concerning what type of water to drink: distilled, reverse osmosis, filtered, mineral water, spring water, tap water.

Dr. Christopher taught, “Distilled water flushes the minerals and inorganic salts, which cause sickness, out of the body, where juice and other liquids are not as efficient.”

“There are two types of minerals in the body - live organic minerals that can be assimilated into cell structure, and low-vibrating inorganic minerals that are only accepted into the body and cannot be assimilated. These inorganic minerals cause kidney stones, gall stones, hardening of the arteries, poor eyesight, arthritis, etc. People so often say, ‘But why shouldn’t I use tap water, well, spring, artesian or some other types of hard water to provide minerals for my body?’ These minerals can be accepted into the body but not assimilated because the hard inorganic minerals must go through plant life and by osmosis changed to live, organic minerals which can then be assimilated into the human cell structure.” The body will accept the inorganic minerals but will not be able to assimilate them and over time, these inorganic minerals will build up within the joints, organs and other areas of the body causing the aforementioned ailments. We should be getting our minerals from the abundance of whole, living foods we are eating which can be assimilated by our bodies. Our bodies were not created to assimilate minerals from rocks, shells, etc.

“How much steam distilled water should I be drinking?” When healing or ill, Dr. Christopher suggested drinking 1 ounce per pound of body weight per day. For those who are not ill or cleansing there really is no set rule; the amount you drink varies from person to person. Things to keep in mind are how much you exercise, the climate you live in, the amount of energy you exert doing daily activities, the amount of fresh fruits and vegetables you consume, etc. Pregnant and nursing women need more water as well. There are a couple of ways to tell if you need more water or are dehydrated besides those already mentioned. The first is by the color and clarity of your urine. Although you need to keep in mind that if you are taking a B12 supplement or consuming nutritional yeast, your urine will be a bright yellow color. The second, gently pinch & pull the skin on the back of your hand upward. The skin should bounce back quickly. If it retracts slowly and holds the pinched shape, you need more water!

Another point that needs to be addressed is that sugar laden fruit drinks, coffee and soda do not re-hydrate the body. For every 8 oz. of soda you consume you need to drink 8-12 glasses of water to replace the valuable water loss it extracts from your cells and organs!

At the School of Natural Healing we suggest steam distilled water, reverse osmosis would be our next choice.

Tonya Judd is a Master Herbalist graduate of the School of Natural Healing

August 18th, 2017A Tale Of Two Carrots

David Christopher, M.H.

The Vitamin A content in carrots is unprecedented in the food supply.  No other food comes close.  We are, of course, talking about the Vitamin A precursor beta-carotene that is easily and readily converted by the liver into vitamin A, assuring the body a constant supply with no dangers of overdose. Vitamin A is essential for proper cell division and growth hence its good effects on tooth health, strong bones and healthy skin. It also helps maintain the thin protective mucus membrane that is essential for the body’s first line of defense involving the white blood cell activity of macrophages.

This effect of Vitamin A is particularly noted in the cell structure of the eye and helps prevent diseases like glaucoma, macular degeneration and cataracts. In no small degree other components found in carrots are necessary in the utilization and functioning of Vitamin A, such as Vitamins B, C, E and some newly discovered micronutrients called polyacetylenes. Two of these polyacetylenes named falcarinol and falcarindiol are cardio-vascular protectorates, assuring adequate delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the cell structure of the eyes.

Carrot juice has been used to control cancer growth and many alternative doctors have seen patients cured of cancer by consuming nothing but carrot juice. However, researchers in Finland found that the consumption of the supplement beta carotene actually increased cancer rates in patients that smoked tobacco by 8% over similar patients receiving a placebo. This study followed 29,000 male smokers for 10 years and was reported in the New England Journal of Medicine on April 14, 1994.

Supplemental beta-carotene is separated from all the other compounds in carrots including but not limited to retinols, retinoids, retenal, carotenoids, carotenes, fatty acids, Vitamins C,E,B complex, enzymes, minerals, phyto-sterols and oxygen.

It is this isolation or separation of synthetic carotenes that causes the classic Vitamin A overdose toxicity symptoms of tumor enhancement, joint disorders, osteoporosis, extreme dryness of eyes mouth and skin, enlargement of liver and spleen, immune suppression and birth defects.  All of these conditions are cured or prevented with carrot juice consumption.

Perhaps the title of this newsletter, Tale of Two Carrots should have been titled TALE OF TWO CAROTENES.  Carotenes in the carrots are safe, but out of the carrots carotenes are unsafe.

David Christopher is a Master Herbalist and the director of The School of Natural Healing. He also co-hosts the popular radio show “A Healthier You” and is a popular international teacher and lecturer.

August 18th, 2017Carbohydrates

Tara Pierce, M.H.

Carbohydrates are one of three macronutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrates) that the body needs for survival. They are called ‘macro’ due to the large quantities in which they need to be consumed. Carbohydrates (carbs) are the body’s main energy source, powering the central nervous system and providing quick energy for working muscles. Carbs are sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, legumes, vegetables and milk products.

Carbs are divided into two main categories; simple and complex.

Simple carbohydrates are sugars that are already in their simplest form and cannot be broken down further. Also called monosaccharide’s (one sugar), these sugars include glucose, fructose, and galactose which are found in fruit and milk products. They are the building blocks of disaccharides (two sugars) such as sucrose and lactose, which are found in foods like table sugar, dairy products, beer and vegetables. Highly processed grains and refined sweeteners fall into this category of carbohydrates because of how quickly they are absorbed by the body and how they affect blood sugar levels. They also have little to no nutritional value. Examples of these foods are candies, soda, syrups, pastries, prepackaged convenience foods, pasta, white rice, white bread, white flour products, white sugar and low fat milk products.

Complex carbohydrates are polysaccharides (3+ sugars) such as cellulose and starch. These carbs are foods that are high in fiber. High fiber foods or complex carbohydrates are digested slower. This helps slow the absorption of sugars, helping to keep blood sugar levels in check. This means that instead of having spikes of high energy from high amounts of sugar hitting the blood stream all at once as with simple carbs, you will have a slower, steady stream of sugars providing lasting energy without the subsequent sugar crash. These foods include beans, peas, lentils, nuts, potatoes (with skin), corn, parsnips and other root vegetables, as well as whole grain breads and cereals. Fiber is also beneficial for cleansing the bowel, aiding digestion and keeping cholesterol levels healthy.

All of the sugars found in both simple and complex carbohydrates are converted by the liver into glucose for immediate use. If the body has too many of these carbohydrates to use immediately, it will store about 2000 calories worth in the liver and skeletal muscles in the form of glycogen. Any excess sugar that is consumed is stored as fat.

Our modern diet is packed full of simple carbs and lacking in complex. This is leading to the rise in obesity, diabetes, heart disease, kidney problems, cancer and is strongly linked to the rise in auto immune diseases. We simply consume too much processed grain and low-fat dairy.

If you are looking to lose weight, clear brain fog, or are struggling with depression or anxiety, take a look at the quality of carbohydrates in your diet. Replacing junk carbs with healthy, high fiber ones will ensure you get the fuel your body needs for healthy brain function and improved digestion. You will find that complex carbohydrates will have a positive influence on your mood, memory and speed of recall.

Remember that carbs are a macronutrient, if you are not eating adequate amounts and your stores are low, the body will in turn begin to burn protein for energy which will take away from normal body function and repair. It is also hard on the kidneys, leading to the passage of painful stones and protein by-products in the urine.

Fill your diet with legumes, vegetables and dark berries to give your body the high quality carbs it craves. If you have digestive issues avoid all grains and processed milk products. (cream products; butter, cream, full fat plain Greek yogurt, are good (for most). Organic and raw are even better.)

Tara Pierce is a Master Herbalist graduate of the School of Natural Healing. She offers private health consultations and teaches nutrition classes to homeschoolers and truth seekers of all ages.


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